Tag Archives: Chen Yi

Chen Yi’s New Piano Concerto, Four Spirits, Premiered in China

The China Philharmonic Orchestra and pianist Clara Yang premiered Chen Yi’s Four Spirits on November 18th in Beijing, China. The ensemble, under the direction of Long Yu, also brought the work to Chapel Hill, NC on December 8th for its U.S. Premiere.


Four Spirits (2016)
For Piano and Orchestra
Solo Pno.; 2(2 = Picc.) 2 2 2 – 4 2 3(B.Tbn.) 1; Timp. 2Perc. Str.
Duration: 26′
Commissioned by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Program Note:
Four Spirits represents the four sacred animals in Chinese legend: the blue dragon in the east, the black xuanwu (a combination of turtle and snake in one) in the north, the white tiger in the west, and the red phoenix in the south. The images have inspired me in my music creation.

The first movement features a bright and refreshing image, with tunes composed in the style of Chinese folk songs drawn from the center part of China, the music is lyrical and energetic.

The sonority in the second movement is dark, mysterious and imaginative, with passionate and expressive layers, as well as vertical soundscapes and space presented by the piano solo.

In the third movement, the dramatic, witted, and powerful characteristics are presented by the patterns in extreme registers on the piano, supported by sections of instruments in the orchestra. This shorter movement serves as an episode towards the final movement.

The fourth movement is fast, lively, fluent, and vibrant. The thematic material is taken from a folk tune in South China. The piano and the orchestra became an organic whole in the four-movement concerto, symbolizing the spirits of the culture from the East.

–Chen Yi
View Perusal Score
LISTEN TO AUDIO
Coming soon…

Chen Yi: Chinese Rap

Chinese Rap
CHINESE RAP
Centaur Records (CRC3440); June 10, 2016
Performer(s): Kennesaw State University Symphony Orchestra, Michael Alexander, conductor; Kennesaw State University Chamber Singers, Leslie J. Blackwell, conductor; Kennesaw State University Wind Ensemble, David Thomas Kehler, conductor; Helen Kim, violin, Robert Henry, piano
Work(s): Chinese Rap
Momentum
Romance and Dance
Set of Chinese Folk Songs Vol. I; Vol. III
Tu for Wind Ensemble
CHEN YI
Four Spirits
(2016)

For Piano and Orchestra – Solo Pno.; 2(2 = Picc.) 2 2 2 – 4 2 3(B.Tbn.) 1; Timp. 2Perc. Str.
Duration: 26′
Commission: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
World Premiere: November 18, 2016. China Philharmonic Orchestra, Yu Long, conductor, Clara Yang, piano; The Forbidden City Concert Hall, Beijing, China.
U.S. Premiere: December 8, 2016. China Philharmonic Orchestra, Yu Long, conductor, Clara Yang, piano; Memorial Hall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.
Program Note:
Four Spirits represents the four sacred animals in Chinese legend: the blue dragon in the east, the black xuanwu (a combination of turtle and snake in one) in the north, the white tiger in the west, and the red phoenix in the south. The images have inspired me in my music creation.

The first movement features a bright and refreshing image, with tunes composed in the style of Chinese folk songs drawn from the center part of China, the music is lyrical and energetic.

The sonority in the second movement is dark, mysterious and imaginative, with passionate and expressive layers, as well as vertical soundscapes and space presented by the piano solo.

In the third movement, the dramatic, witted, and powerful characteristics are presented by the patterns in extreme registers on the piano, supported by sections of instruments in the orchestra. This shorter movement serves as an episode towards the final movement.

The fourth movement is fast, lively, fluent, and vibrant. The thematic material is taken from a folk tune in South China. The piano and the orchestra became an organic whole in the four-movement concerto, symbolizing the spirits of the culture from the East.

–Chen Yi
audio-coming-soon

Chen Yi Honored at Hartt School of Music

Chen Yi will visit the Hartt School of Music during the last week of April, where she will be awarded an Honorary Doctoral Degree by the University of Hartford (CT). She and her husband, Zhou Long, will attend the school as Featured Guest Composers and take part in a six-day event that will include composition masterclasses and multiple performances of their work.

The first concert on April 27th will feature two chamber works by Chen Yi: Duo Ye for Solo Piano and Happy Rain on a Spring Night for Flute, Clarinet, Violin, Cello, and Piano. On April 29th Edward Cumming will lead the Hartt Symphony Orchestra in a performance of Momentum for Orchestra. The celebration of Chen Yi’s music will draw to a close over the subsequent two days, April 30th and May 1st, as five of her works for wind ensemble are performed by four different ensembles. Featured works include Wind, Dragon Rhyme, Tu, Spring Festival, and Suite from China West.

EXPLORE A FEW OF THE WORKS TO BE PERFORMED AT THE FESTIVAL BELOW

DUO YE
for Solo Piano

…the best music is the lyrical middle section where delicately ornamented tunes mimic traditional pentatonic melodies.

–American Record Guide

HAPPY RAIN ON A SPRING NIGHT
for Flute, Clarinet, Violin, Cello, and Piano

…a non-stop build of energy and color that crests and refreshes like an ocean wave…

–Fanfare

…very successfully fuses spare, sinuous traditional Chinese elements with the complexity and rhythmic vibrancy of the European modernist tradition. … memorable for its astonishing effects…

–San Antonio Express-News

TU
for Wind Ensemble

…a fierce 14-minute outcry. Written as both a howl of pain in response to the attacks of September 11, 2001, and a tribute to the New York firefighters who lost their lives, “Tu” takes off with a crash and rarely flags in its unbridled energy.

–San Fransisco Chronicle

Chen Yi: Ballad, Dance and Fantasy

…everyone in the audience was amazed with the musician’s “electrifying” playing techniques and appreciated every sound coming out of his instrument.

–Natalia Dagenhart, Chicago Tribune