Symphony No. 3

Jay Reise

Rental
Publisher: Merion Music, Inc.
Print Status: Rental

Quick Overview

Symphony No. 3 was commissioned by Christopher Keene and the Long Island Philharmonic Orchestra and funded by grants from the Rockefeller Foundation and the Daniel W. Dietrich Foundation. Additional funding for a sabbatical and copying the parts was provided by the University of Pennsylvania. The work is dedicated with admiration and affection to Christopher Keene, and to the Long Island Philharmonic Orchestra.

As in my previous two symphonies, my primary aim is to express emotions (generally love, fear, and wonder) meaningfully through music. Although some special effects particular to new music are used, the underlying musical philosophy is clearly not doctrinaire in its avant garde elements, but rather is catholic in its orientation.

Symphony No. 3 is in three movements: I. Chorale Prelude (Variations): II. Adagio; and III. Toccata. Each of these titles designates a previously well-known gestural device, reinterpreted beyond its original generic meaning, and used as a point of departure. The chorale prelude, well known because of J.S. Bach, consisted of a prescribed melody played over an elaborated chordal accompaniment. Although my Chorale Prelude has an original rather than a given melody, and is written in the tonal/atonal context of new music, it retains a number of characteristics of Bach?s chorale prelude such as the chordal writing, registral groupings, succinct phrases, and, above all, the characteristic gestures of a chorale. The Adagio, subtitled ?Long Island Sound? (a tribute to both the Long Island Philharmonic and the region where I grew up), is impressionistic and expansive. The concluding Toccata is whirlwind of musical energy and instrumental virtuosity. Lasting about twenty minutes, the work is the length of a Classical Symphony.

The phrase ?Awakening to Memory? arises from my growing sense that memory can be an avenue to new and not just revived to knowledge. The subtitle is also an homage to a late friend of whom memory has awakened an expanded consciousness. Musically, it refers to my personal discovery that the transcendental experiences of music can be (and perhaps must be) repeated over and over again: the technology of music changes, but its essential most meaningful, and eventually indescribable marvels do not.

Available on Rental

Additional Information

Commission Commissioned by Christopher Keene and the Long Island Philharmonic Orchestra and funded by grants from the Rockefeller Foundation and the Daniel W. Dietrich Foundation. Additional funding for a sabbatical and copying the parts was provided by the Univers
Composition Date 1984
Duration 00:18:00
Orchestration 3(Picc.) 3(E.H.) 3(B.Cl.) 3(Cbsn.) - 4 3 3 1; Timp. 3Perc. Pno. Cel. Hp. Str.
Premiere March 24, 1985. Long Island Philharmonic Orchestra, Christopher Keene, conductor; Long Island University, Long Island, NY