The Norman Dello Joio Vocal Collection

Norman Dello Joio

Text by
Sir John Suckling
John Addington Symonds
Stark Young
Arthur Symons
Robert Hillyer
Walter De La Mare
Anonymous Elizabethan
Lenore G. Marshall
Robert Browning
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Chidiock Tichborne
Sandburg,
Instrumentation: voice, Piano
Item Number: VF20
Number of Pages: 56
Publisher: Carl Fischer Music
Print Status: In Print

$14.95
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Quick Overview

A descendant of a long line of Italian church organists and the son of a Metropolitan Opera vocal coach, composer Norman Dello Joio wrote for all instruments, but most naturally, for voice. Carl Fischer has compiled 12 of his vocal works in this collection as a tribute to his legacy. The collection opens with a heartfelt foreword from revered tenor Paul Sperry, well-known for championing of the American art song and his work on the subject at Manhattan School of Music. The Norman Dello Joio Vocal Collection features works for mostly medium and high voices, such as “Lament” and “There is a Lady Sweet and Kind,” but also includes “The Assassination” for low voice. For intermediate to advanced-level singers.

The Norman Dello Joio Vocal Collection

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Preface by Paul Sperry
All Things Leave Me (Waltz Song) ù Arthur Symons ù Medium
Assassination, The (Two Fates Discuss a Human Problem) ù Adapted by the Composer from the Peom by Robert Hillyer ù low
Dying Nightingale, The ù Stark Young ù high
Eyebright ù J. Addignton Symonds ù medium
How Do I Love Thee? ù Words Adapted by the Composer from the Poem by Elizabeth B. Browning ù high
Lament ù Poem by Chidiock Tichborne (ca. 1558-1586) Written on the eve of the poet's execution ù medium
Listeners, The ù Poem by Walter de la Mare ù medium
Meeting at Night ù Poem by Robert Browning ù high
Mill Doors ù Poem by Carl Sandburg ù high
New Born ù Words by Lenore G. Marshall ù medium
There Is a Lady Sweet and Kind ù Poem by an Anonymous Elizabethan ù medium
Why So Pale and Wan, Fond Lover? ù Poem by John Suckling ù medium